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Shuttered East Village Cheese Shop Is Starting to Smell

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Plus, the big business of viral food — and more intel

East Village Cheese Shop is starting to rot

Mysteriously closed now for two weeks, with no word as to why and the phone number out of service, East Village Cheese Shop is starting to stink. The storefront at 80 East Seventh Street, between First and Second Avenues, has had its power shut off while being shuttered, which is leading to a potent odor of rotting cheese seeping into nearby businesses, like East Village Hats next door. According to EV Grieve, the landlord is aware of the situation but concerned about legally being able to enter the storefront — but there’s still no word on why this is happening.

Is Out East over?

Another curious closure case is Out East: The Long Island-inspired Lower East Side restaurant has reportedly been shuttered the last two nights, despite social media inviting people in. It hasn’t been the easiest eight months for the restaurant, with at least two head chef shuffles already occurring. Eater has reached out to the restaurant for more information.

New York magazine and Bloomberg weigh in on the best food of 2017

As the year quickly comes to a close, food writers everywhere are reflecting on what they ate in 2017. From New York magazine critic Adam Platt comes his best new restaurants, which include The Grill, Ato, Hanoi House, and Ugly Baby. As for Bloomberg’s Kate Krader, she kvelled over food from Atla, The Pool, Uchu, Sunday in Brooklyn, Madame Vo, and more.

The big business of viral food

No one will be surprised to discover that restaurants are striving to create food solely for Instagram these days — but it’s a bit shocking to see just how much of a business has been created around that. In a big story over on Eater.com, data reporter Vince Dixon writes, “Many former pastry chefs, photographers, and (sometimes) students and part-timers have managed to crack the code of viral, attracting clients willing to pay to become the next Instagram hit.” Check out the full story here, which cites NY restaurants like Juniper Bar and Union Fare, and watch below for a look at if Instagrammable food equals good food:

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maise
28 days ago
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Love East Village Cheese - that really stinks
Jersey City
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Netflix has optioned John Scalzi’s military science fiction novel Old Man’s War

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After years of teases and dead ends, we might yet get an adaptation of John Scalzi’s 2006 military science fiction novel Old Man’s War. Deadline reports that Netflix has optioned the book to develop as a film, with Scalzi coming on board as an executive producer.

Scalzi’s fans have been down this path before, though. Paramount Pictures previously optioned the novel and its sequels in 2011, with Wolfgang Petersen attached to direct. The Syfy Channel began developing the series in 2014. Both projects petered out. Still, Scalzi tells The Verge he’s optimistic about the project, pointing to Netflix’s recent track record with genre stories like Stranger Things and the recent Stephen King adaptation 1922, plus Altered Carbon, which is on the...

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maise
42 days ago
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this is a good idea...very fun book that should make a good netflix movie.
Jersey City
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Soda With Bitters

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Image: Farther Along via Flickr

Last winter, I embarked on my first Drynuary with a mix of shock and self-righteousness. I was thirty-fucking-five years old and I seriously, SERIOUSLY, couldn’t remember going an entire month without drinking. By Day 5, my husband told me, I started reminding him of the straight-edge kids from high school. But, I was really onto something. Wasn’t it crazy that we configured our lives around the consumption of alcohol, the same way that we configured our living rooms around television sets? Wasn’t it odd that we were always a little inebriated around friends and coworkers? How could we tell who we really were if we spent so much time in an altered state? He suggested I listen to some Youth of Today and opened a beer.

Even though I wasn’t drinking, I was determined to keep up with my social obligations, which meant I often found myself in bars, explaining to people that I had sworn off booze for the month. Around Day 12, I found myself in that particular circle of hell known as Hotbird on a Friday night. It was here that my friend Nadja introduced me to her coping mechanism for her own Drynuary: seltzer with a dash of bitters.(Bitters are also, 44.7 percent alcohol, so a dash is either technically disqualifying for the “dry” part of Drynuary, or a symbolic way of partaking without partaking. It’s between you and your Oprah.) The idea was, she explained, was to, more or less, fool yourself by ordering a signature cocktail, which conferred a sense of agency, rather than a sense of deprivation. It was quirky, it was refreshing, and it was delicious.

The classic bitters in most bars are Angostura bitters, which have a delightful and convoluted history, assembled here entirely from this Wikipedia entry. Its ingredients are “water, 44.7% ethanol, gentian, herbs and spices.” Gentian is a beautiful blue flower. The “spices” are a secret proprietary blend. A German doctor working in Venezuela came up with the recipe and started making them in a town called Angostura, which means ‘narrow’ in Spanish. The name of the town is a reference to the narrowing of the Orinoco River, which is home to the Amazon river dolphin and the giant river otter. There’s also a plant in South America called Angostura trifoliata, which is used in other bitters recipes, but not, ironically, in Angostura bitters. The label is strangely oversized because of a miscommunication among the doctor’s sons who took over the business after his death.

Despite these Amazonian origins, Angostura bitters taste, to my immigrant mouth, distincly American. The aromatics echo baking—cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, licorice—an herbaceous concentrate of pie with a bit of sweetness. In a glass of seltzer, the bitters add a lovely garnet tinge, and a perfumey detour from the sharp fizz of the carbonation. You can sip it, thinking of otters and Amazonian rivers and lose yourself in a veritable jungle, while your drunk friends yammer on about the latest sexual harassment revelations.

As a former bartender, my first experience with bitters involved mixing ill-proportioned Manhattans and Old Fashioned at a shitty bar on Lower East Side. Who ordered cocktails at a sports bar anyway? And what was I doing there? Mostly I used bitters as a hiccup remedy: a slice of lemon, a sprinkle of sugar, and a dash of bitters worked like a charm on countless tipsy patrons.

Now, ordering seltzer and bitters I was forced to confront the same inexpert service that I’d provided to my customers. Some bartenders interpretted my request for a dash of bitters with a “more is more” approach and delivered seltzers mixed with a shot of bitters. Although, maybe, they were extending me a strange professional courtesy, since a shot of bitters is a popular version of the “bartender’s handshake,” a sort of ritual shared by the drink-slinging community. But every once in a while, it was as it should be. The bartender would fill a glass with seltzer, set it on the bar, and in front of my eyes, dispense, with a flick of the wrist, the perfect dash. And then the crimson would swirl among the bubbles, like a puff of smoke.

For the rest of the month, and in the year since, I’ve ordered dozens of seltzers with bitters. Some time after I wrapped up Dryanury, I embarked on another month-long exercise in self-torture: the Whole 30. (Yes, I know, technically bitters aren’t compliant, I don’t care.) A few months later, I had another extended episode of insomnia and stopped drinking to try and fix the problem.

The first seltzer and bitters of a dry month feels like a secret oath. I promise that I won’t drink for a month. I promise to be better to myself. I promise to be generous to others. (I promise to invent better essay endings than this classic three-beat bullshit.) And, the bitters filter through the seltzer, while hiss of the carbonation whisper, “I’ll be there for you.” And, then Bon Jovi starts to sing.

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maise
58 days ago
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Jersey City
sgiglio
58 days ago
are you supporting seltzers with bitters or condemning as a seltzer aficionado
maise
58 days ago
need to try this before i decide...sounds kind of good.
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Lin-Manuel Miranda's Kingkiller Chronicle series is heading to Showtime

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The upcoming TV show based on Patrick Rothfuss’ fantasy trilogy The Kingkiller Chronicle has found a home at Showtime. The show is part of an ambitious slate of projects that will adapt the best-selling books into various media, including movies from Lionsgate and video games. As for the TV version, Hamilton creator…

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maise
83 days ago
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Jersey City
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Sorry, but Haribo gummies are reportedly made with slave labor

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The days when we were concerned—or at least, I was, being an earnest teenager in a Clash T-shirt—about Starbucks putting local coffee shops out of business seem so quaint and far away now, curled up in a cozy sweater knit in a Vietnamese sweatshop reading articles on an iPhone about how the carnauba wax and animal…

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maise
84 days ago
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well thats disappointing - they are still the best gummies out there
Jersey City
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Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard had a cameo in the latest 'Game of Thrones' episode

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Noah Syndergaard Game of Thrones

Warning: Spoilers ahead for "Game of Thrones" season seven, episode four, "Spoils of War."

Sunday night's episode of "Game of Thrones" gave fans a lot of what they wanted. "Spoils of War" featured a few reunions and battles that longtime viewers had been waiting for for years, including our first look at the damage a dragon can do to a Lannister army.

With all the action, it was easy to miss a cameo by Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard, who appeared for a brief moment as a spear-wielding Lannister soldier attempting to fight off the onslaught of the Dothraki horde. While only onscreen for a second, Syndergaard, whose fastball can break 100 mph, did get some use out of his powerful arm, throwing his spear so hard that it knocked a Dothraki off its mount.

Syndergaard is a known fan of "Game of Thrones" and has even used the show's intro as his walk-up music .After the show, he posted a few tweets expressing his excitement with the appearance.

Fans on Twitter seemed to enjoy the cameo as well.

Syndergaard has been out with an injury since late April, but the Mets are hoping that their young star will be back on the mound before the end of the season. His character, despite his accuracy with the spear, was likely burned alive by dragon fire.

SEE ALSO: Christian McCaffrey, who will make $11 million this year, can't watch 'Game of Thrones' because he doesn't have his parents' password

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NOW WATCH: 8 details you might have missed on season 7 episode 4 of 'Game of Thrones'

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maise
164 days ago
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Jersey City
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